How do you learn 3 languages ​​easily

This is how I learned 9 languages ​​- the 10 best tips for language learning

Matthew Youlden, himself fluent in 9 languages, explains his method

Matthew Youlden is fluent in nine languages ​​and understands at least a dozen more. We work in the same office in Berlin, which means I've seen him in action many times - Matthew jumps effortlessly from language to language, he's a real language chameleon. For a long time I didn't even know he was British. When I told Matthew that I was already studying a single Foreign language causes a lot of problems, he gave me the following tips for language learning. If one or the other feels the same way, watch out now!

This is how I learned 9 languages ​​- the 10 best tips for language learning

1. Make sure you understand why

It might sound trite, but if you don't have a good reason to learn a new language, you probably won't stay motivated in the long term. Trying to impress someone with your French is not a particularly good motivation. Getting to know a French person in his or her mother tongue is another matter. For whatever reason you want to learn a language, once you've made up your mind, it's important to stick with it: “Okay, I want to learn this language and that's why I will be in this language as much as possible, with this language and do for this language. "

2. Jump into the cold water

So you've made your vows. How are you going now? Which method is the right one to learn a new language? Matthew recommends the 360 ​​° envelope: Either way, it's crucial to use your new language every day:

“Right from the start I want to soak up as much as possible like a sponge. When I learn something new, I really get hooked and aim to use it all day. During the week I try to think in the language, write and even talk to myself. For me, it's about putting what I've learned into practice - regardless of whether that means writing an email, talking to myself or listening to music or the radio. Surrounding yourself with the new language and immersing yourself completely in the new language culture is one of the most important tips for language learning. "

Remember: Ultimately, the best thing about speaking a language is getting into conversation with people. Just being able to have a simple conversation is a rewarding experience in itself. If you have such a sense of achievement early on, it is much easier to stay motivated and keep learning:

“I always have in the back of my mind that the point is to adapt your own way of thinking to the way of thinking in the other language. Of course, not all Spanish, Hebrew or Dutch speakers think in the same way, but the point is to use language as a means to create your own language world. "

3. Find a partner

Matthew learned several languages ​​with his twin brother Michael. They tackled their first foreign language, Greek, together at the tender age of 8! Matthew and Michael, or them Super Polyglot Bros.As I use to call them now, their superpowers owe to the good old sibling rivalry:

“We were very motivated and still are. We incite each other to really hang in there. When he notices that I'm doing more than he does, he gets a bit jealous and tries to outstrip me (maybe because he's my twin) - the other way around. "

Even if you don't have a brother to accompany you on your language adventure: Learning together with a partner - whoever they are - will make both of you try a little harder and stick to your business:

“I think that's a really good approach. You have someone you can talk to and that's the idea behind learning a language. "

4. Stick to the basics

If your goal from the beginning is to be able to have a conversation, you will be less likely to get lost in textbooks. If you then actually speak to other people in the new language, your learning process will remain relevant to you:

“You learn a language to be able to use it, not to speak it to yourself. The really creative thing about language learning is being able to put the language into a useful, everyday context - whether that's writing lyrics, the general need to exchange ideas with people or a stay abroad. But you don't necessarily have to go abroad - you can just go to the Greek at the end of the street and order your meal in Greek. "

5. Have fun with it

Whichever way you use your new language, it is a creative act. The Polyglot Bros practiced Greek by writing and recording songs. Come up with interesting, fun ways to practice your new language: record a radio show with a friend, draw a comic, write a poem, or just talk to anyone you can. If you can't think of a way to have fun with your new language, the suspicion is that you skipped step number 4 of our tips on language learning.

6. Be childish

Not that you're breaking into tearful tantrums or rubbing food in your hair at a restaurant - try to eat like a kid learn. The assumption that children naturally have an easier time learning than adults seems to be a fallacy. According to new research, no direct link can be found between age and ability to learn. So in order to learn as quickly as a child, one should perhaps simply try to display some childlike behaviors; For example, don't be shy about speaking, use the language in a playful way and don't shy away from making mistakes.

We learn by making mistakes. While children are expected to make mistakes, it is taboo for adults. Adults are more inclined to say “I can't do this” than to say “I haven't learned this yet” - “I can't swim”, “I can't drive a car”, “I can't speak Spanish”. The fear of failing in front of others (or even just struggling with something under observation) is a social taboo that does not weigh on children. One of the best tips for learning a language is admitting that you don't know everything and accepting that that's absolutely fine. Free yourself from your adult self-consciousness!

7. Come out of your snail shell

The willingness to make mistakes also means entering into potentially embarrassing situations. This can be scary, but it's the only way you can move forward and get better. No matter how much you boggle - you don't learn to speak without going out of your way: whether it's talking to someone you don't know, asking for directions, ordering a meal or trying to tell a joke. The more often you get into such situations, the more comfortable you feel and the more relaxed you react to breaking new linguistic territory:

“At the beginning you always run into difficulties: it could be the pronunciation, the grammar, the syntax or maybe you don't really understand the idioms. But I think the most important thing is just to get a feel for the language. Every native speaker has a feeling for their own language and that is what makes a native speaker basically - the ability to make the language their own. "

8. Listen

If you want to paint something, you have to learn to look properly before you pick up the brush. The same goes for language learning: in order to speak, you have to learn to listen. Every language sounds strange and strange the first time you hear it, but the more you expose yourself to the new language, the more familiar it becomes and the easier it becomes to speak it:

“We can say anything, we're just not used to it. For example, the rolled [r] does not exist in my variant of English. When I was about to learn Spanish there were words like perro and reuniónwho have a hard [r]. For me, the best way to get this under control was to hear it all the time. I listened carefully and tried to imagine how it should be pronounced correctly, because for every sound there is a certain part in the mouth or throat that we use to generate the sound. "

9. Watch people speak

Different languages ​​place different demands on the tongue, lips and throat. Pronunciation is as much a physical as it is a mental phenomenon:

“It makes sense to look closely at someone while he or she is uttering words with a certain sound and then try to mimic that as best you can. This may be difficult at first, but it works. It's actually very easy, it just requires a little practice. "

If there isn't a native speaker to watch and imitate up close, foreign language films and television are good substitutes.

10. Talk to yourself

If you don't have someone to talk to, there's nothing wrong with having a conversation with yourself:

"That might sound strange, but speaking to yourself in a different language is a great way to practice speaking a foreign language when you don't use it all the time."

This way you can memorize the vocabulary and sentences you have just learned and become more confident the next time you speak to someone in the language.

Still haven't had enough of tips on language learning? Then here's another bonus tip: Relax!

You won't get on people's nerves just because you speak their language badly. If you initiate a conversation by saying, "I'm still learning and I would like to ... practice," most people will be considerate, patient, and even encourage you. In only a few countries is German understood and even if you may already be able to speak English well, it is worth learning another foreign language. Because even though there are roughly a billion people in the world who speak English as a foreign language, most of them would prefer to speak in their own language if given a choice. Taking the initiative and stepping into someone else's linguistic world helps to loosen up your counterpart and creates a positive mood:

"Sure you can travel abroad and speak your own mother tongue, but you gain so much more when you actually get involved with the place - have conversations, understand what's going on and can interact with people in every imaginable situation."

Tips for learning languages ​​all well and good - but what does that bring me?

We've covered the best tips for language learning, but you might still be wondering Why should you learn a language? Matthew has another good point:

“I think every language opens up a certain perspective on the world. When you speak a certain language, you will perceive and interpret the world around you differently than someone who speaks a different language. Even related languages ​​such as Spanish and Portuguese, which to some extent resemble each other, open up two different worlds of language - two different ways of thinking.

Therefore, although I have learned many languages ​​and have been surrounded by many different languages, I cannot just choose one language, because that would mean giving up the opportunity to see the world from different angles. Not just in one way, but in many different ways. That is why, for me, a monolingual way of life is the saddest, loneliest and most boring way of looking at the world. Learning a language has so many advantages, I can't think of a single reason against it. "

With this inspiring worldview and lots of tips for learning languages, we wish you lots of success!

John-Erik Jordan
John-Erik Jordan is originally from Los Angeles, California. He studied art at Cooper Union in New York and worked as a video editor in LA before devoting himself to writing. He has lived in Berlin since 2009 and has written for PLAYBerlin, Hebbel am Ufer and various online publications, among others. He has been writing about languages ​​at Babbel since 2014.
John-Erik Jordan is originally from Los Angeles, California. He studied art at Cooper Union in New York and worked as a video editor in LA before devoting himself to writing. He has lived in Berlin since 2009 and has written for PLAYBerlin, Hebbel am Ufer and various online publications, among others. He has been writing about languages ​​at Babbel since 2014.

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First a brief introduction: I have put together the following five points from my own experience as a language teacher and learner as well as from my work at the start-up of a language learning app. I have given language lessons in Germany and Spain for six years and developed a start-up for language learning via video. However, I came to language learning itself relatively late. When I was 22 I started to learn Spanish and by 28 I was able to speak Spanish and German in addition to my mother tongue (English). In the past few years I've used apps and faced two grueling week-long challenges in which I successfully learned Italian and French (see videos) from zero to a hundred. \

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So before you download an app, there are five things to think about: \

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Experience a new world \

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Avoid an app that claims to be the holy grail of language learning, the ultimate solution, the answer to all of your questions. This is exactly the laudable and honest goal of all teachers and developers who are behind the best apps (and the worst marketing chatter); but it is also not entirely in line with the ideals of these teachers. Do you find this confusing? Let me explain: The people behind the apps absolutely want to build the best possible product, and they are also passionate language learners themselves. And every experienced language learner will assure you: The best thing about striving for and achieving the mother tongue level of a foreign language is the world that opens up to you. It's a world full of diverse sources of information - from newspapers and books to television, radio, music and, yes, even real people. Would you ever limit your mother tongue to a single medium? Most likely not, so why should you do this with a foreign language? I recommend that you use the app extensively, but not exclusively. \

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New habits \

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Set yourself a goal and develop habits: Do you want to be able to speak fluently in a few weeks or do you feel more like brain jogging? The good apps help you to structure your learning project and to integrate it into your schedule. The best apps react to your habits and change accordingly. They help you build habits successfully so that you can return to the app regularly. How does it look for you? Personally, I am a Reformed early-morning mail reader. Instead of rummaging through emails that I don't answer in the office anyway, I finish a class or two and then practice what I have learned in the shower in self-talk. It may sound strange, but it is effective. \

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Reward your achievements \

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Don't forget that the app is a means to an end - a great means, but not the ultimate end. A good app drives you playfully. What does that mean? App developers use the elements of game designers so that what makes us addicted to video games is used for educational apps. That sounds fuchsia? Maybe it is, but it serves a good cause: to keep learning! You will seldom hear someone hunched over the textbook and say, “I'm totally addicted to learning Spanish.” Just don't forget your inner motivation and your own goal in front of all the external triggers and rewards: This is not reaching the fifth level or the bestowal of virtual ones Laurel wreaths.That is, making yourself comfortable at a Spanish bar with the locals and enjoying the \caña \ accompanied by an unhealthy portion \Pimientos de Padrón\ to enjoy.\

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Your opinion counts \

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We appreciate your feedback! I don't mean this as an empty slogan to reduce the distance between faceless developer and learner. Your feedback is really worth gold in all honesty. Why? Because of two things: On the one hand, the whole fuss about revolutions and world changes is a bit contagious. This means that such a motivation boost promotes the app in the direction of excellence. App developers listen carefully to your feedback. On the other hand, everything you can do within the app can be optimized quickly and with maximum benefit. It's almost like Charles Darwin's. Unless you're one hundred percent delighted, the faceless developers frown ... um, browbones. So tell us what you think Or even better: put your thoughts in an email. Everything can and will be better. \

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Involve your fellow human beings \

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Make it social. No, I don't mean you should post your progress on Facebook. I mean, do it real socially. I attribute my progress in Italian to my supportive / competing campaigner Jim, who took up the same challenge. Find someone to study with you. Support your learning with an evening course. Borrow a book. Buy a book. Book a week's vacation and take a language course. Just don't forget your cell phone! \

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I can freely reveal that the combination of app, language school, Jim, evening entertainment and one or two books has proven to be very effective. It's not easy for an Englishman to put a disgusting frosting on everything, but I honestly wondered to myself what was possible this week. I ended up making friends in Italian. It was incredibly fulfilling. I highly recommend it.\

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I wrote this article entirely on my smart phone in a fashionable orange aircraft above the clouds. Technology is wonderful. \

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Apps can help you in any situation: to stay fit, contact friends or even learn languages. All you should know is how to use an app to get the most out of it. Here's a guide to using an app - from someone who does it all the time. \

Ed M. Wood originally comes from Wells, the smallest city in England, and now lives in Berlin. He studied psychology at the University of Southampton before working as a teacher and translator in Spain, England and Germany. He then completed an MA in political science in Bath, Berlin and Madrid. Languages, cultures and travel are among his main interests and it was these three things that ultimately led him to the Babbel Tower, where he still resides to this day. \

Ed M. Wood is originally from Wells, the smallest city in England, and now lives in Berlin. He studied Psychology at the University of Southampton before working as a teacher and translator in Spain, England and Germany. He then undertook a MA in Political Science in Bath, Berlin and Madrid. His main interests lie in the areas of language, culture and travel. \

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Ed M. Wood originally comes from Wells, the smallest city in England, and now lives in Berlin. He studied psychology at the University of Southampton before working as a teacher and translator in Spain, England and Germany. He then completed an MA in political science in Bath, Berlin and Madrid. Languages, cultures and travel are among his main interests and it was these three things that ultimately led him to the Babbel Tower, where he still resides to this day. \

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Ed M. est originaire de Wells, la plus petite ville d'Angleterre. Il vit aujourd'hui in Berlin. Il a fait des études de psychologie à l'Université de Southampton avant de travailler en tant que professeur et traducteur en Espagne, en Angleterre et en Allemagne. Il s'intéresse particulièrement aux langues, à la culture et aux voyages, et ce sont ces trois choses qui l'ont mené jusqu'à la tour de Babbel où il réside actuellement. \

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Ed M. Wood è originario di Wells, la città più piccola dell'Inghilterra, e oggi vive a Berlino. Ha studiato psicologia all'università di Southampton prima di lavorare come insegnante e traduttore in Spagna, Inghilterra e Germania. Ha poi proseguito gli studi con un Master in Scienze Politiche a Bath, Berlino e Madrid. I suoiinteresti principali sono le lingue, le culture e i viaggi e sono proprio queste tre cose che lo hanno portato fino alle torri di Babbel, la sua residenza attuale. \

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Ed M. Wood é originário de Wells, a menor cidade da Inglaterra, e agora vive em Berlim. Ele estudou Psicologia na Universidade de Southampton antes de trabalhar como professor e tradutor na Espanha, na Inglaterra e na Alemanha. Ele, ainda, aventurou-se em um MA em Ciências Políticas em Bath, Berlim e Madrid. Seus interests principais se habenram nas áreas de idiomas, cultura e viagens e são exatamente essas três coisas que o guiaram às torres de Babbel, onde ele atualmente se habenra. PT \ Siga-me \ no Twitter. \

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\ Ed pochodzi z Wells, najmniejszego miasta Anglii, a obecnie mieszka w Berlinie. Studiował psychologię na Uniwersytecie Southampton, a następnie pracował jako nauczyciel i tłumacz w Hiszpanii, Anglii i Niemczech. Jest absolwentem nauk politycznych na uczelniach w Bath, Berlinie i Madrycie. Interesuje się przede wszystkim językami, kulturą i podróżami. \

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Ed es originario de Wells. Estudió psicología en la Universidad de Southampton antes de trabajar como profesor y traductor en España, Inglaterra y Alemania. Después emprendió los estudios de máster en ciencias políticas en Bath, Berlin and Madrid. Sus principales intereses se centran en las áreas del lenguaje, la cultura y los viajes. \

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Ed M. Wood, originally från Wells, England's minsta stad, men bor nu i Berlin. Han studerade psykologi vid universitetet i Southhampton och jobbade som lärare och översättare i Spain, England och Tyskland, innan han tog sin master i statsvetenskap i Bath, Berlin och Madrid. Eds främsta interests är språk, culture and att resa - tre saker som slutligen förde honom till Babbels Högkvarter. \

Have you ever learned a new language? Did you go to school for hours because of it? Words written on index cards for days? Buffed up for tests for weeks? \

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And what were the results? Has success emerged? If not, we have good news for you: There is an alternative to these traditional and outdated learning methods! \

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There is a better way to learn languages. \

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Hello, we are Babbel. We can assure you that it is possible to speak a foreign language fluently without the struggle. Of course we don't have a magic formula, a well-kept secret or an ultimate "life hack". Instead, we simply know how, thanks to modern technology and the latest learning methods, we can make language learning much more effective and easier than \the old school \!\

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Speak confidently \

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Perhaps you know those critical looks when you have to speak a foreign language in front of everyone else in school - that's actually not the most pleasant feeling - or when a teacher has already pulled out his red pen and is leaning over your exercise book. You can definitely spend your time better. \

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Our language courses are structured in such a way that they strengthen your self-confidence. It's about being able to start speaking a foreign language as quickly as possible. We guarantee this by serving the foreign language in bite-sized bites - i.e. in relevant lessons that build on each other - so that you regularly learn different skills and always remain motivated. So we can calmly put the red pencil aside. \

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Real Conversations \

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We love books, don't get us wrong. Our team of professional linguists regularly review new releases in the field of language teaching research to ensure that we continuously develop progressive and realistic language courses. This is so important to us because we want to offer the best learning content. We want to prevent that you learn a foreign language slowly and ineffectively through unnecessary and outdated methods. \

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In short: our didacticians guarantee that you will not learn anything in our courses that cannot be used in a very practical manner in a conversation. So you can close the dusty and dry books - and you don't have to keep repeating the sentence \The black cat from Hatfield \ to repeat. Instead, you are now able to have real conversations! \

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Whenever and wherever you want \

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Actually, we are always on the move, be it privately or professionally. And sometimes we are in several places at the same time. For most of us, it is therefore not possible to sit in a classroom for hours on a day-to-day basis. \

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At Babbel, we take your time seriously. That's why our lessons are between five and ten minutes long or short. You can easily complete a lesson on your smartphone, tablet or PC - and switch devices at any time. For this short time you are guaranteed to be fully concentrated and thus optimize your learning efficiency. \

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So Babbel is always there for you when you have a moment. And last but not least, subscribing to our language courses is also significantly cheaper than daily tutoring. \

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The old school of language learning can be quite annoying - and there is a better alternative. \

\ Behind the language learning app Babbel are 750 people from 50 countries who have one thing in common: their passion for languages. More than 150 language learning experts have developed high-quality, consecutive courses for 93 language combinations. It is therefore no wonder that Focus Money once again recognized Babbel as the best language learning app in the Germany Test 2018. \

\ We are a team of more than 750 people from over 50 nations with a shared passion for languages. From our offices in Berlin and New York, we help people discover the joys of self-directed language learning. We currently offer 14 different languages ​​- from Spanish to Indonesian - that millions of active subscribers choose to learn. \

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\ Behind the language learning app Babbel are 750 people from 50 countries who have one thing in common: their passion for languages. More than 150 language learning experts have developed high-quality, consecutive courses for 93 language combinations. It is therefore no wonder that Focus Money once again recognized Babbel as the best language learning app in the Germany Test 2018. \

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\ Nous sommes une équipe de 750 personnes originaires de 50 pays différents, et nous avons en commun la même passion pour les langues. Depuis nos bureaux de Berlin et de New York, nous aidons les gens à découvrir les joies de l'apprentissage des langues. Nous offrons actuellement 14 langues d'apprentissage différentes - de l'anglais à l'indonésien - et des millions d'utilisateurs actifs ont déjà fait le choix de Babbel. \

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\ Siamo un team di oltre 750 people provenienti da più di 50 nationali accomunate dalla passione per le lingue. Dai nostri uffici di Berlino e New York, aiutiamo le persone a scoprire le gioie derivanti dall'apprendimento autodiretto delle lingue. Attualmente offriamo l'opportunità di scegliere tra 14 lingue diverse (dallo spagnolo all'indonesiano), che milioni di abbonati attivi decidono di imparare. \

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\ Somos uma equipe de 750 pessoas originárias de 50 países, mas com uma paixão em comum: idiomas. Dos nossos escritórios em Berlim e Nova York, ajudamos outras pessoas a descobrir as maravilhas proporcionadas pelo ensino online de idiomas. Atualmente, oferecemos 14 idiomas de aprendizado - de espanhol a indonésio -, acessados ​​por milhões de usuários. \

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\ Jesteśmy zespołem złożonym z ponad 750 osób 50 narodowości, które łączy wspólna pasja: kochamy języki. Pracujemy w filiach w Berlinie i Nowym Jorku, pomagając ludziom na całym świecie w odkrywaniu zalet indywidualnej nauki języka dzięki aplikacji. Obecnie oferujemy aż 14 języków nauki \ - \ a nasze mobilne aplikacje są pobierane nawet do 120 000 razy dziennie. \

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\ Somos un equipo de 750 personas provenientes de más de 50 países con una pasión en común: los idiomas. Desde nuestras oficinas en Berlin y Nueva York, ayudamos a la gente a descubrir las maravillas del aprendizaje autónomo. Actualmente ofrecemos 14 idiomas distintos, desde inglés hasta indonesio, y nuestras aplicaciones móviles se descargan hasta 120,000 veces al día. \

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There is a team of 750 people from 50 countries that are all brinner for språk. Från våra Kontor i Berlin and New York hjälper vi menniskor att upptäcka glädjen i självstudier i språk. Vi erbjuder 14 olika språk för tillfallet - från spanska till indonesiska - som miljoner aktiva subscriber väljer att lära sig. \

In the midst of the current election cycle, the United States appears more divided than it has been for 150 years. And with such a range of origins, values ​​and traditions that have been flowing together in the gigantic melting pot for 500 years, it is no wonder that the nation cannot quite agree on what it actually means to "be American" . \

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So what else holds the Americans together? Well, we asked our American colleague John-Erik and he asked his friends and acquaintances and they asked their friends and acquaintances and ... any American would probably agree that he or she has mastered the following ten "arts of being American" . So if you are planning a visit to the USA and want to do the same as the people from the country do, follow these tips from John-Erik and you will definitely fit in - whether you are in Boston, New York, Nashville, Dallas, Cheyenne or San Francisco! \

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1. The Art of Small Talk \

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Don't be shocked if you walk into a store and an employee you see for the first time in your life asks you: \"How are you?"\ - "How are you?" That is not an outrageous question. In America, politeness is not expressed through aloof respect, but one tries to be pleasant and personable. Being "excessively" familial isn't superficial or an act - it's just the social norm. \

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The appropriate answer to \"How are you?"\ is not \really\ to answer, but to return the question: \"Good, how are you?" \, or even more familiar: \"What's up?"\ The situation is similar in French with \"Ça va?" \ or in Portuguese with \"Tudo bem?" \.\

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When you find yourself in a small talk situation with a stranger, there are certain topics that you can always rely on: weather, sports, and yesterday's TV program. You should avoid politics, religion and discussions about salary; except when you're among friends - but sometimes not even then! \

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2. Take full advantage of your own language area \

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It's not that Americans are loud, it's just that, well, the music in the café might be a bit loud, and then we can't really hear each other over the conversation at the next table and ... \

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The "typical" American volume may be a bit shocking at first - you are literally forced to overhear someone else's conversations on the subway, in restaurants or in the supermarket. It's easy to get used to, though, especially if you put your shyness aside and join the cacophony. \

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Bonus: If you \with pleasure\