Technically speaking, we humans are not extraterrestrials for someone

Physicist claims: contact with aliens would be our end - or theirs

A Russian physicist claims to have found out why we have not yet met any aliens. His thesis is quite unsettling - and predicts a grim fate for humanity.

If there is alien life in the universe, why haven't we found it long ago? Scientists have been grappling with this train of thought, known as the Fermi Paradox, for almost 70 years. A Russian physicist has now found an answer that is anything but flattering for human civilization.

Our galaxy alone contains 100 to 300 billion stars. And it is so old that even comparably slow spaceships or probes from extraterrestrial civilizations could have reached us long ago. But radio signals from foreign cultures have not found their way to Earth, nor have we been able to discover any traces of extraterrestrial technology.

The physicist Enrico Fermi described this paradox between the seemingly endless possibility of alien life in space and the complete lack of concrete evidence of it as early as 1950. The physicist Alexander Berezin of the National Research University for Electronic Technology (MIET) in Moscow now claims that Fermi To have resolved the paradox.

Doomed

In a thesis put up for discussion on the scientist platform Arxiv, Berezin assumes that a civilization will inevitably wipe out all other civilizations as soon as it has acquired the skills to travel interstellar or intergalactic. He calls this principle “first in, last out”. In German: the first to arrive and the last to leave.

In his controversial thesis, Berezin does not assume that the world destroyers have any bad intentions. A civilization geared towards maximum expansion would simply not notice less developed forms of life.



What Berezin then writes is reminiscent of Douglas Adams' satirical novel "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy", in which the earth had to give way to an intergalactic highway. "Probably a highly developed way of life would simply not perceive us, just as a construction worker does not see an anthill that he destroys as worthy of protection when he builds a house."

Damn humanity

If one thinks this steep thesis further, mankind can consider itself lucky not to have been extinguished yet. However, the physicist goes one step further and predicts a future for our species that is "worse than the complete annihilation of our civilization."



Because Berezin names the reason why we have not yet had contact with extraterrestrials as follows: Other forms of life have not yet developed to our level. This means that they have no space programs and cannot send interstellar communication signals.

In conclusion, this means for Berezin: We humans are the first to be technically capable of colonizing the universe - and are therefore doomed to wipe out all other civilizations in the next billions of years.

Simplified assumptions

Humanity as the evil superpower of the universe? Skepticism may well be appropriate: Berezin’s thesis has been waiting for some time to be scientifically tested. So far, no colleagues have been found who would like to deal with the supposed solution of the Fermi paradox.

This may also be due to the fact that the Russian physicist made several simplifications in his assumptions. Among other things, he reduces the definition of life to the core point of growth, which he describes as the urge to expand beyond the planet of origin. If this urge becomes the dominant force, all other life in the universe is in danger.



Although there have been enough examples in human history alone of how deadly an uncontrolled urge to colonize is deadly, Berenzin hopes that the fate of humanity (and all other life forms in the universe) outlined by him is not set in stone.

“I hope that my predictions are wrong,” he concludes his thesis. The only way to find out would be to keep searching the universe for other life forms. Hopefully we can talk to them before the first intergalactic spaceships leave Earth on the path of destruction.

Mysterious beings and creatures

Mysterious beings and creatures

An evergreen among the monstrous apparitions is the Loch Ness monster (here in an early photo from the 1930s) in Scotland. Allegedly it was first mentioned in the 6th century, is world famous today and is sighted with a certain regularity - most recently even in England! Unfortunately, so far, almost all of the pictures have turned out to be more or less well-made forgeries. In times of the possibilities of digital image processing, Nessie, as the monster is also affectionately known, will certainly appear even more often.

Image: Keystone

The head of the little mummy from the Atacama desert in Chile is reminiscent of typical ideas of extraterrestrials. We show more finds of mysterious beings and creatures in this series of pictures.

Image: Bhattacharya S et al./ Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory / dpa

Doll of the so-called Roswell alien in the International UFO Museum in Roswell, New Mexico: The creature from space is said to have been recovered in the desert of New Mexico with a UFO in 1947 and was then supposedly scientifically examined. According to an official report, the flying saucer is said to have been a military aircraft that has been tested. The alien himself only gained fame with a film about the events from 1995 and was probably only made of latex - an existence before that is not guaranteed.

Image: Getty Images

A TV report from 1997 suspects the reason for the legend of the Roswell alien, quite conclusively, to be a dummy like this one, which was dropped over the site during an experiment with a parachute from a great height.

Image: Keystone

This alleged yeti scalp in the monastery of Pangboche in Khumbu, Nepal - here on a recording from the 1970s - has since disappeared due to unexplained circumstances. (Archive)

Image: Getty Images

US researchers now examined DNA samples from alleged yeti remains, including a piece of hairy skin from a hand or paw that had been kept in a monastery and a piece of thigh bone that had been found in a cave on the Tibetan plateau in 4500 meters altitude was found.

Image: Getty Images

The secret of the white deer in Hessen has been solved - it is red deer with a special genetic make-up. "We managed to find the gene and can say exactly what the percentage of carriers is," explained scientists from the University of Giessen.

Image: dpa

The animals are the subject of superstition: whoever kills a white stag dies within a year - that's what the hunter's Latin says. In the picture: White red deer (Cervus elaphus) stand in the Sababurg zoo in Reinhardswald (Germany) on May 24, 2017.

Image: dpa

In December 2016, a very strange object suddenly lay on the beach near Auckland, New Zealand - the so-called “Muriwai Monster”.

Image: Getty Images

Not only was it a long, but it smelled like hell too. Melissa Doubleday who raised the hype about the object on Facebook with her question “I'm curious. Does anyone know what that is?" had kicked off, reported later: "Everything on it has died in the meantime and it stinks really bad."

Image: Getty Images

Countless barnacles stuck to the mysterious find, with hosts of worms cavorting in between. A local Facebook group was busy puzzling over what was hidden under the crawling surface. Some thought of the carcass of a whale, others believed it could be an ancient Maori canoe. Particularly creative contributors believed in an alien time capsule or a "beach Christmas tree".

Image: Getty Images

Somebody from the Facebook group wanted to know more and asked the experts at the New Zealand Marine Research Association.

Image: Getty Images

There they had a slightly less exciting explanation in store. The experts said it was most likely a huge driftwood covered in barnacles. The half-rotted tree and its animal inhabitants were said to have been set in motion by the strong earthquake in November and washed up on the beach.

Image: Getty Images

The so-called Cardiff Giant is considered a safe fake: The mysterious giant was excavated in the village of Cardiff near New York in 1869. Later it turned out that it was a man-made statue, with which the tobacco grower George Hull wanted to make fun of the pastor of the place.

Image: Getty Images

The so-called Cottingley Fairies (German: Cottingley fairies) were documented in 1917 in five photos of the young cousins ​​Frances Griffiths and Elsie Wright in Cottingley, England. The photos later turned out to be forgeries - Elsie, who was gifted in drawing, had copied them from a book on cardboard, cut them out and staged them in front of her. The fake fairies are still considered to be one of the biggest hoaxes of the 20th century.

Image: Getty Images