Which language is more simple Turkish or Indonesian

Is It Hard to Learn Turkish? - 5 tips to master the Turkish language

Is Turkish an easy or difficult language? We'll show you some exceptions and rules of Turkish so that you can get an idea for yourself.

The question of whether Turkish is a simple language is answered very differently. That is not surprising. Because on the one hand it is not an Indo-European language, but a Turkic language and therefore very unlike German. But if you get involved with them and familiarize yourself with some of the rules, you can quickly see the logic and regularity of the language. There are hardly any exceptions, and rules are internalized and applied naturally after a short time. The following tips will make it easy for you to learn the language too.

Tip 1: One sound = one character - Turkish is so easy!

Turkish has a special feature that makes reading and writing particularly easy for the learner once you have learned the alphabet: Each letter corresponds exactly to one sound - and vice versa. For example, the Turkish "s" is always voiceless (as in the German word Cures), also at the beginning of the word, for example in simit (“Sesamring”), and the Turkish “z” always voiced like the German “s” in sagen. Conversely, a sound can only correspond to one letter. For example, the German [sch] (one sound, three characters) corresponds to the Turkish [ş] (one sound, one character). Since the [x] is made up of two sounds, namely [k] + [s], it is also reproduced in Turkish with these, as in the word taksi ("Taxi").

Another advantage is that Turkish has also used the Latin alphabet since the language reform by Mustafa Kemal Ataturk in 1928. So you don't have to learn a completely new alphabet, but you have already mastered a large part. And you have now also learned how to pronounce the letter "ş". Now it's your turn: What is hidden behind the words? şinitsel, şoför, mayonez, kokteyl, müzik or mikser? With internationalisms you can practice reading and writing very well!

Tip 2: No articles and no genders - Turkish is so economical!

The does not exist in Turkish, the and the neither. So you save time and nerves when learning new words, because you don't have to learn articles or differentiate between genders. Also a gender separation in the personal pronouns he, you and it is not present. The pronoun O is used for all three - and that can even be left out. In Turkish, the person is indicated by the verb ending and personal pronouns are only necessary if they are to be emphasized, for example Top oynuyor. ("He plays ball.") - O top oynuyor. * ("He plays ball. "). Otherwise, sentences can quickly sound unnatural.

No articles, no genders, no pronouns ... oh yes, and no plural form for quantities with numbers. It is evident, after all, that it is at five Apples by more than one acts. The noun just stays in the singular, otherwise it would be doubled: bir elma ("An apple") - beş elma ("Five apples").

Tip 3: The sentence order and the numbers - Turkish is so "the other way around"!

Most of the Indo-European languages ​​like German have the sentence order Subject - Verb - Object (SVO): Ali (subject) - plays (verb) - ball (object). The sentence order in Turkish is against it Subject - Object - Verb (SOV), so "Ali is playing ball." (Ali top oynuyor.). The verb is at the end of the sentence. To understand texts faster, you simply look for the verb of the sentence and then break down the sentence from the back. This saves you from pondering for a long time and the meaning is quickly grasped.

Speaking of "the other way around": Unlike in German, numbers are read from left to right, i.e. actually the right way round. The numbers are very regular. Once you have the units and tens as well as the words for "hundred" (yüz), "Thousand" (am) and so on, you can build all numbers. 10 is for example on. After that you simply put the numbers 1 to 9 and you have all the numbers up to 19. The formation of all other numbers works in the same way - without exceptions: 2315 = iki ("two") am ("thousand") üç ("three") yüz ("hundred") on ("ten") beş ("five").

Tip 4: agglutination - Turkish is so logical!

Turkish is an "agglutinating" language, which means something like "sticking together". Endings are appended to words to form the plural, to express the past, to indicate persons or cases, to negate verbs and much more. The noun does not change. Here's an example: Evdeyiz. You wonder what this word means? It is not a word, but a whole sentence, a noun with endings that fulfill various functions. Possibly means "house". The first ending is attached to it -de. This corresponds to the locative case. Don't worry, it sounds more complicated than it is. Since there are no prepositions in Turkish (like in, at, on and others) more cases are needed than in German. The locative is the "where-case". So you always use when you want to show Where someone or something is located, the ending -de. Our example evde means "in the house" or "at home". The next ending is the personal ending for the first person plural -yiz. The sentence Ev-de-yiz. means “we are at home”. As mentioned above, personal pronouns are only used for emphasis. Therefore the "we" (biz) not available here. And the verb “sein” is reproduced over the personal endings.

Even if it may seem strange at the beginning, you will see how quickly you develop a feeling for it. Once you know the rules and the meaning of the different endings, leave yourself sentences like Arkadaş-lar-ımız-da-yız ("Friends-e-our-with-we are." = "We are with our friends") completely unimpressed.

Tip 5: The vowel harmony - Turkish is so harmonious!

So that words still sound nice after sticking so many endings on, they follow the rules of vowel harmony. The vowel harmony runs through the entire Turkish grammar. It is used to facilitate pronunciation. Because Turkish words usually only have front vowels (i.e. those that are spoken in the front of the mouth: [e], [i], [ö], [ü]) or only back vowels (those that are spoken in the back of the mouth: [ a], [ı], [o], [u]), which are closer together and thus make pronunciation more natural. The vowels of the endings adapt to the vowels of the noun.

There are two rules: the small vowel harmony and the large vowel harmony. Endings that are based on the small vowel harmony have two forms, such as the locative ending. it is -de, if the last vowel of the reference word is one of the front vowels [e], [i], [ö] or [ü], as in Berlin ’de * ("in Berlin"). And * -da, if the last letter in the word is a back vowel, so [a], [ı], [o] or [u] as in İstanbul ’there ("In Istanbul"). (The “i without a dot”, “ı”, by the way, is an extra vowel in Turkish that is spoken very far back in the mouth, similar to the [e] in Gardenen. In order not to confuse it with the capital "i" in capitalization, the "i with period" also always has an "İ" in capitalization.)

In the case of the great vowel harmony, endings have four different forms. Depending on which vowels precede them, the endings with [ı], [i], [u] or [ü] follow. And this is how the "ü" s, which are very common for the German ear, can be explained. Let's take the word üzgün ("Sad"). Possible endings for this word would be personal endings and the question particles, whose vowels are adjusted to those of the noun according to the large vowel harmony. And that's how sentences like Üzgünsünüz. ("You are sad.") Or as a question Üzgün ​​mussünüz? ("Are you sad?"). And the riddle about the many "ü" s would be solved!

An interesting aside to the [ü]: Ataturk is said to have oriented himself to the German alphabet during the language reform when he replaced the Arabic alphabet with the Latin one. And even if the [ü] is used as a sound in other languages, the “u-umlaut” has been adopted as a letter from the German alphabet. Who would have thought that …?

The good news is that as a learner, you internalize vowel harmony very quickly. So just rely on your feelings and you will see how quickly you can use them intuitively without having to think about the rules! And that applies to most of the peculiarities of the Turkish language.

Fidi
Fidi, born and raised in Hamburg, loves ships, the sea and the harbor - but without bad weather! That's why she studied international communication in Spain, among other places, and later worked as a translator in Turkey, always with the sea in view. After her studies and a stopover in Hamburg, she finally followed Babbel's call and moved to Berlin.
Fidi, born and raised in Hamburg, loves ships, the sea and the harbor - but without bad weather! That's why she studied international communication in Spain, among other places, and later worked as a translator in Turkey, always with the sea in view. After her studies and a stopover in Hamburg, she finally followed Babbel's call and moved to Berlin.

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"Impossible! Do you realize how difficult Turkish is? It's not like learning Italian or Spanish. I mean, it's really hard! ”- said Kutay, a colleague and a native of Turkey, on the morning of the first day when he walked into Matthew and Michael's apartment. The brothers answered Kutay's skepticism with shining eyes and even more enthusiasm for the project. According to plan, they started studying at eight in the morning - they had already devoured two books within the first 90 minutes. \

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Kutay was stunned to hear the two talking animatedly. His skepticism was gone and he was now convinced that the twins would be able to speak the language before the end of the week. Meanwhile, Matthew and Michael played off each other with more and more new sentences and grammatical constructions and looked for confirmation in Kutay's reactions. The three nibbled Turkish chips and ate Turkish sweets while discussing the slogans and nutritional information on the packaging. After an hour it was time to leave the twins to their own devices again. We gave them a small handheld camera to record their video diary and practice their pronunciation, and so we said goodbye for the first day. \

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Day 2\

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Every Tuesday and Friday there is a Turkish market on Maybachufer in Berlin Kreuzkölln. With its white tarpaulins, which are chaotically draped over market stalls, the market extends along the Neukölln Landwehr Canal. The twins had only learned Turkish for 26 hours when the camera team and I joined them on one of the canal bridges. Her first real world test was literally just around the corner. They had learned fruit and vegetable vocabulary in preparation - most of them were \poverty\ ("Pears") and \elma \ ("Apples") got stuck. As Michael noted, \poverty\ thanks to his homophone in German, both recognition value and a funny aftertaste - after all, you don't buy poverty every day. \Elma \ on the other hand, resembles the Spanish \alma \, which means "soul". \

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It was Michael’s turn first and successfully exchanged money for \poverty\. He was grinning all over his face as he turned to us; his first step to success was taken. Now it was Matthew's turn. He strolled to the stand and informed the dealer of his intention. At first he was a little surprised - people usually come to the market to shop and not to chat. Then he seemed positively impressed. In the meantime, Matthew had either forgotten the word for apples or changed his mind - in any case, instead of apples, he took two kilograms \portal \ ("Oranges") with. \

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With that we said goodbye to the twins as they walked towards the subway towards another afternoon of intensive study. \

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Day 3 \

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The third day Matthew and Michael were devoted entirely to studying. We therefore only briefly entered her apartment, which had changed a lot since Monday: The walls were papered with notes and books were strewn everywhere. Still in high spirits, the twins were preparing to have their first Turkish conversation with a native speaker the next day. \

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Day 4 \

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Alician comes from Istanbul and is currently studying computer science in Berlin. He also works as a translator and editor. We met him at the Rotes Rathaus and then strolled over to Michael and Matthew's apartment. Alician was just as skeptical of the twins' venture as Kutay had been before. Like a cryptographer who wrote a seemingly indecipherable code, he raved about the myriad of difficulties Turkish learners face. He was not exactly enthusiastic about the "stilted conversation with two bloody beginners". \

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The film team from \Star TV \ was just packing up when we arrived. They were just as fascinated by the twins' project as we were. After asking Matthew and Michael all morning in German, their third foreign language, we naturally expected to find them exhausted. Wrong thought: Instead, the twins now pounced on Alican, as they had already done with Kutay on the first day, and asked him one question after the other: “Why is it this way and that, and is it really like this or is it Book out of date? ”We quietly set up a camera in the dining room and encouraged them to continue their conversation. After the conversation, Alican was clearly impressed: “It's really amazing that you can speak so well after just 4 days. You can even connect sentences. I'm really surprised how fast you learn. "\

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Day 5 \

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Not far from our office is a popular Turkish restaurant, where waiters and waitresses whirl around the tables, take orders and deliver food, surrounded by excited voices and jingling tea glasses. As we sat down, the owner rushed over to greet Matthew and Michael in person. For the next few hours, the twins chatted with Kutay, deciphering the menu, and using the names on the menu to try to guess the origins of the dishes. At the end of the restaurant visit, Kutay leaned back in his chair: “Well, I've been living in Berlin for a while and I'm still having difficulties with my German. You two pretty much reached my level within four and a half days. What's your secret? "\

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Day 6 \

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The week had passed by in a flash, all the sticky notes had been successfully held on the wall and now, as small, colorful monuments, were reminiscent of a week of diligent study. Only 24 hours until the twins are put to the test. For the first time, both seemed to suffer a little from the pressure of expectation. They were concerned that they had focused too much on learning nouns and thereby using the modal verbs (\may, can, like, must, should \ and \want\) and neglected conditional clauses - so now we also know what causes linguistic geniuses sleepless nights! The interesting thing about modal verbs in Turkish is that they actually don't exist. Instead, modality is expressed using suffixes, i.e. suffixes.The principle doesn't sound particularly difficult, but putting the right suffix in the right place in the verb at the right time as you speak is another story entirely. Because of the challenge ahead, the twins had started speaking Turkish to each other. In doing so, they created a world that we - with our comparatively modest language skills - could not see through. Still, it was a pleasure to watch - and watching was all we could do. \

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Day 7 \

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A week isn't particularly long to learn a language, but that's exactly what Matthew and Michael had set out to do. I had invited the twins into my apartment for their last challenge: The boss of the Super Polyglot Brothers had neither a turtle shell with spikes on his back, nor a cloak and sword (as you know it from bosses, at least in video games), but came in the form of the friendly smiling Kutay - but this time with the instruction to speak only Turkish. Of course, I had no idea what the three were talking about. And how fluently the brothers spoke, I could only deduce from their speed. They paused every now and then to restructure confused sentences and kept gaining and losing momentum as they jumped back and forth between ambition and attempting grammatical correctness. \

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After 40 minutes the conversation was interrupted by a knock. Oz stepped into the room. Oz - the one from the Emerald City? Well, almost: Oz is an entertainer from Istanbul, who with \Turkish for Hipsters \ Bringing Berliners closer to Turkish pop culture - including bizarre music, films from the 60s and 70s, and Turkish food that looks beyond the edge of the kebab plate. Just like the great wizard, this Oz was an impressive figure: Although he did not have a large head, he did have many, mysteriously changing hats. The brothers shift restlessly in their chairs. What were they getting into? \

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In the following hour - half party, half quizz show - we immersed ourselves in the Turkish film industry and music scene, identified Turkish types of bread and found out how to distinguish a quality doner from a "nöner". Oz even gave a short lecture on linguistics and illustrated how German-Turkish youngsters play with grammar and vocabulary of both languages ​​and thus create a creole language. Then it disappeared as quickly as it appeared. \

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After the efforts of the past week, I made the brothers a cup of tea and we reviewed the past week - in English. Were you satisfied with your progress? What was the highlight of your week? What was the low point? Did you develop an appetite for Turkish and would you keep learning it in the future? You never know. Maybe a second part of the challenge in Istanbul will follow ... there is hope! \

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Can you learn Turkish in just seven days? It sounds impossible, but Babbel's super language twins decided to do it anyway. \

Ed M. Wood originally comes from Wells, the smallest city in England, and now lives in Berlin. He studied psychology at the University of Southampton before working as a teacher and translator in Spain, England and Germany. He then completed an MA in political science in Bath, Berlin and Madrid. Languages, cultures and travel are among his main interests and it was these three things that ultimately led him to the Babbel Tower, where he still resides to this day. \

Ed M. Wood is originally from Wells, the smallest city in England, and now lives in Berlin. He studied Psychology at the University of Southampton before working as a teacher and translator in Spain, England and Germany. He then undertook a MA in Political Science in Bath, Berlin and Madrid. His main interests lie in the areas of language, culture and travel. \

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Ed M. Wood originally comes from Wells, the smallest city in England, and now lives in Berlin. He studied psychology at the University of Southampton before working as a teacher and translator in Spain, England and Germany. He then completed an MA in political science in Bath, Berlin and Madrid. Languages, cultures and travel are among his main interests and it was these three things that ultimately led him to the Babbel Tower, where he still resides to this day. \

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Ed M. est originaire de Wells, la plus petite ville d'Angleterre. Il vit aujourd'hui in Berlin. Il a fait des études de psychologie à l'Université de Southampton avant de travailler en tant que professeur et traducteur en Espagne, en Angleterre et en Allemagne. Il s'intéresse particulièrement aux langues, à la culture et aux voyages, et ce sont ces trois choses qui l'ont mené jusqu'à la tour de Babbel où il réside actuellement. \

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Ed M. Wood è originario di Wells, la città più piccola dell'Inghilterra, e oggi vive a Berlino. Ha studiato psicologia all'università di Southampton prima di lavorare come insegnante e traduttore in Spagna, Inghilterra e Germania. Ha poi proseguito gli studi con un Master in Scienze Politiche a Bath, Berlino e Madrid. I suoiinteresti principali sono le lingue, le culture e i viaggi e sono proprio queste tre cose che lo hanno portato fino alle torri di Babbel, la sua residenza attuale. \

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Ed M. Wood é originário de Wells, a menor cidade da Inglaterra, e agora vive em Berlim. Ele estudou Psicologia na Universidade de Southampton antes de trabalhar como professor e tradutor na Espanha, na Inglaterra e na Alemanha. Ele, ainda, aventurou-se em um MA em Ciências Políticas em Bath, Berlim e Madrid. Seus interests principais se habenram nas áreas de idiomas, cultura e viagens e são exatamente essas três coisas que o guiaram às torres de Babbel, onde ele atualmente se habenra. PT \ Siga-me \ no Twitter. \

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\ Ed pochodzi z Wells, najmniejszego miasta Anglii, a obecnie mieszka w Berlinie. Studiował psychologię na Uniwersytecie Southampton, a następnie pracował jako nauczyciel i tłumacz w Hiszpanii, Anglii i Niemczech. Jest absolwentem nauk politycznych na uczelniach w Bath, Berlinie i Madrycie. Interesuje się przede wszystkim językami, kulturą i podróżami. \

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Ed es originario de Wells. Estudió psicología en la Universidad de Southampton antes de trabajar como profesor y traductor en España, Inglaterra y Alemania. Después emprendió los estudios de máster en ciencias políticas en Bath, Berlin and Madrid. Sus principales intereses se centran en las áreas del lenguaje, la cultura y los viajes. \

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Ed M. Wood, originally från Wells, England's minsta stad, men bor nu i Berlin. Han studerade psykologi vid universitetet i Southhampton och jobbade som lärare och översättare i Spain, England och Tyskland, innan han tog sin master i statsvetenskap i Bath, Berlin och Madrid. Eds främsta interests är språk, culture and att resa - tre saker som slutligen förde honom till Babbels Högkvarter. \

\ Illustration by Sveta Sobolev \
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This article is for those who break into a sweat, who have a twisting stomach, who falter and who only say "um" when they forget a word in a foreign language. That happens a lot: you learn a language and suddenly you can't think of a word - or maybe you never knew it. Since talking to native speakers is very valuable and helpful for the learning process, missing vocabulary should not prevent you from looking for a conversation. Because there are quite a few techniques that can help you avoid the problem of wordlessness. You certainly already know some of them. This article aims to list them again and hopefully make sure that you \internalize \ and use it when learning languages. \

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Prevent!\

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Are you giving a lecture off the cuff? Definitely not - because preparation is essential to deliver a fluent and logically structured speech. In the same way, a little preparatory work can help you so that you don't suddenly run out of words in a conversation. But how do you prepare a natural conversation that can go anywhere? It's simple: by practicing finding synonyms and paraphrasing words instead of translating them: For example, if you find the unfamiliar English word \chatterbox \ jumps towards it, then link it with English spelling that is already familiar to you, such as: "\a person who likes to chatter, someone who talks a lot, a blabbermouth, a gabber, a jabberer, a tattletale, a bigmouth \"- and the German translation" Quasselstrippe "is probably no longer necessary because you understand the meaning of \chatterbox \ understood that too. \

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If you have a learning partner, then you can also "practice spontaneity" together - just like theater actors in drama school first have to learn to improvise: You can play against each other to find out who can paraphrase a new vocabulary with the fewest words can, or stop the time and write down as many associations as possible to a new word. \

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So much for preparing for a meeting. But what do you do when things get serious? \

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Use your synonyms and explanations! \

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Activate what you have learned before! If that doesn't work, you still have the following options ... \

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Rate\

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Guessing a word sounds funny at first, but that shouldn't stop you from giving it a try. For example, I can speak English fluently, but French only badly. So, since around 30% of English vocabulary is French in origin, I have a pretty good chance of guessing the correct word if I simply pronounce an English word with a French accent. In the remaining cases, I approach the vocabulary at least enough to convey what I wanted to express to my interlocutor. And because the goal of language is not necessarily grammatical correctness, but communication, I have successfully found my way through the conversation (English: \the conversation \, French: "äääähm ... \la conversation \?“ – „\oui, conversation \!") devices. You don't have to know English to make good guesswork: The German language has also borrowed a lot in the course of its language history, so you will be familiar with foreign words (like \Conversation\ instead of \Conversation\) that you Anglify, French, Spanish, or whatever you modify, are often understood. \

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Make yourself words \

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Building words is basically a special form of guessing. My acquaintances who are learning German do it and are usually lucky - after all, German is not famous for stringing words together and thus forming new words: “\What was the word for "refridgerator"? I forgot… well… what does it do? It cools things \ ("Cool") \and it's a kind of closet \ ("Closet")… \Fridge\?" Exactly! Even if, conversely, you will sometimes not be so lucky because some languages ​​borrow more than form compound words, it is much easier for the other person to understand the meaning of the word and to help you on your way if you \something\ say instead of \Nothing\ accept.\

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Show physical activity \

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So you've already rummaged in the back of your head for synonyms, guessed it unsuccessfully and nobody understood your DIY words either. Your speaking apparatus and the parts of your brain that operate it have failed you. Nothing helps. Now it's time to get stuck! Full physical effort is required: use your arms, hands, legs and your facial expressions. The mouth can also use it again, because it can be used to create wonderful noises. Silent film actors were able to express themselves without words 100 years ago! Offer your interlocutor a show that has it all: You can't think of the word for “duck”? Fortunately, there are \ hand shadow games \ that you can accompany with loud duck croaking. And what was the word for "goose" again? Shadow duck extended, neck long, eyes closed and through! My mother successfully uses this technique to communicate with people of all nations and ages. And although she has already waved her arms a lot, she has not yet flown (where we have just talked about ducks and geese), she is understood and admired for her physical effort and her willingness to communicate! Mama is just the best (at communicating and something like that). Oh yes, and speaking of mothers, let's move on to the next tip. \

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Say it in your \Mother\language\

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This method should be the very last resort. After all, you want \other\ Learn languages ​​and don't keep falling back on your mother tongue. If you are already using your mother tongue, then be strict with yourself: only the word that you did not think of will be asked for in your mother tongue. The rest of the conversation will still be conducted in the language of instruction! \

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Bonus tip: Be aware that people \With\ talk to you! \

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According to \ Paul Grice's principle of cooperation \ people don't talk to each other, but (surprise!) \together\! So don't feel bad if you can't think of a word. You are finally taking a giant leap in conversing in another language. Your interlocutors will also move towards you and work towards successful communication with you. So have fun practicing! \

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A well-known problem: You are talking in a different language and suddenly you can't remember a word - or maybe you never knew it. These techniques will help you avoid the wordlessness problem. \

Katrin Sperling was born and raised in Potsdam and spent a year in Toronto, Canada after graduating from high school. Because her Hogwarts letter had still not arrived on her 20th birthday in 2011, she finally had to accept reality and studied English and German linguistics in Berlin. Fortunately, linguistics turned out to be just as magical, which is why Katrin is very happy to be writing about languages ​​for Babbel Magazine. \

Katrin (Kat) Sperling was born and raised in Potsdam, Germany and moved to Toronto, Canada after high school. Since her Hogwarts letter still hadn't arrived by her 20th birthday in 2011, she finally had to face reality and went to study English and German linguistics in Berlin. Luckily, linguistics turned out to be just as magical, and Kat is now very happy to write about learning languages ​​for the Babbel Magazine. \

\ n "," de ":" \

Katrin Sperling was born and raised in Potsdam and spent a year in Toronto, Canada after graduating from high school. Because her Hogwarts letter had still not arrived on her 20th birthday in 2011, she finally had to accept reality and studied English and German linguistics in Berlin. Fortunately, linguistics turned out to be just as magical, which is why Katrin is very happy to be writing about languages ​​for Babbel Magazine. \

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Katrin (Kat) Sperling est née et a grandi à Potsdam, en Allemagne. Après le lycée, elle est partie vivre à Toronto, au Canada. N'ayant toujours pas reçu de lettre de Poudlard à son vingtième anniversaire elle a dû se résigner à faire face à la réalité en commençant des études en linguistique à l'université de Berlin. Heureusement pour elle, les langues aussi sont magiques et elle se réjouit aujourd'hui d'écrire des articles sur l'apprentissage des langues pour le magazine Babbel. \

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Katrin (Kat) Sperling è nata e cresciuta a Potsdam, Germania, e dopo il liceo si è trasferita a Toronto, Canada. Non avendo ancora ricevuto la sua lettera da Hogwarts per il suo ventesimo compleanno nel 2011, ha deciso di affrontare finalmente la realtà e andare a studiare linguistica inglese e tedesca a Berlino. Fortunatamente, la linguistica si è rivelata altrettanto magica e ora Kat è felicissima di scrivere articoli sullo studio delle lingue per il magazine di Babbel. \

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Katrin (Kat) Sperling nasceu e cresceu em Potsdam, Alemanha e mudou-se para Toronto, Canadá depois de terminar o ensino médio.Uma vez que suas cartas para Hogwarts nicht chegaram até o seu vigésimo aniversário, ela decidiu estudar Anglística e Linguística germânica em Berlim. Felizmente, linguistas acabam virando verdadeiros mágicos e por isso, agora, Kat está muito feliz em escrever sobre aprendizado de idiomas para a revista da Babbel. \

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\ Katrin (Kat) Sperling urodziła się i wychowała w Poczdamie. Po szkole przeprowadziła się do Toronto. Aż do swoich dwudziestych urodzin w 2011 roku czekała na list z Hogwartu, jednak gdy ten jednak never przyszedł, postanowiła wreszcie stawić czoło rzeczywistości i pójść na studia. Studiowała lingwistykę angielską i niemiecką w Berlinie. Na szczęście lingwistyka okazała się równie magiczna co czary i dziś Kat z przyjemnością pisze dla Magazynu Babbel o tym, jak skutecznie uczyć się nowych języków. \

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Kat es alemana, nació y creció en Alemania y estudió lingüística inglesa y alemana en Berlin. Actualmente vive en Canadá y se alegra de poder escribir sobre aprendizaje de idiomas en la revista de Babbel. \