What is the input of cellular respiration

Cellular respiration A learning program for the development of an overview of the energy-supplying processes Lutz Wischeropp, 2001 on.

Presentation on the topic: "Cellular respiration A learning program for the development of an overview of the energy-supplying processes Lutz Wischeropp, 2001 on." - Presentation transcript:

1 Cellular respiration A learning program for the development of an overview of the energy-supplying processes Lutz Wischeropp, 2001 further.

2 After working through this program you should have a memorable overview of the processes of cell respiration. Cell respiration is the process in the cell by which the energy necessary for life processes is provided

3 Click next and begin the program.
To work through this program, you will also need specialist literature, e.g. your textbook. Click on next and start the program. Next

4 For all life processes the cells need the
Organisms energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The largest part of this energy is obtained through a process that we call the respiratory chain. In this process, hydrogen reacts with oxygen. This process is created. Click the correct statement! Carbon dioxideWaterOzoneSulfur dioxide

5 Unfortunately you were wrong
Unfortunately you were wrong! Think about why your answer couldn't be correct!

6 Correct! You have already come to know such a reaction, namely in biology lessons ("photosynthesis"). In biology lessons ("digestion"). In physics lessons ("ozone formation"). In chemistry lessons (" Oxyhydrogen reaction ”). Click on the correct statement!

7 Unfortunately you were wrong
Unfortunately you were wrong! Think about why your answer couldn't be correct!

8 Correct, only that our cells don't "bang" at all! So there has to be a difference between the "oxyhydrogen reaction" and the processes in the respiratory chain. Find out more in the literature! On the next page you will find three statements. Click on the one that you think is the right one!

9 In the oxyhydrogen reaction, a spark ignites a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen and a lot of energy is released explosively. The respiratory chain is a process that corresponds formally to the oxyhydrogen reaction, only the release of energy takes place step by step, whereby the energy is stored in high-energy molecules and is not suddenly lost as heat to the environment. substance and oxygen ignited and explosively released a lot of energy. The respiratory chain is a process that runs counter to the oxyhydrogen reaction. The energy is obtained from high-energy molecules and gradually released as heat to the environment. During the oxyhydrogen reaction, a spark ignites a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen and releases a lot of energy like an explosion. The respiratory chain is a process that corresponds formally to the oxyhydrogen reaction, only the release of energy takes place here step by step, whereby the energy is stored in low-energy molecules and is not suddenly lost as heat to the environment.

10 Unfortunately you were wrong
Unfortunately you were wrong! Think about why your answer couldn't be correct!

11 Correct! The process of cell respiration can also be represented graphically in a simple form (input-output). You will find a corresponding suggestion on the following page

12 This graphic shows the input-output ratios of the respiratory chain
OxygenATP respiratory chainHydrogenWaterThis graphic shows the input-output relationships of the respiratory chain correctly, since all processes are correctly represented. Not correctly again, since oxygen is produced during this process. Not correctly again, since ATP is formed during this process. Not correctly reproduced because this process produces hydrogen.

13 Unfortunately you were wrong
Unfortunately you were wrong! Think about why your answer couldn't be correct!

14 The presentation of the respiratory chain is consistent in terms of content.
OxygenATP respiratory chainHydrogenWaterRight! The representation of the respiratory chain is consistent in terms of content

15 Living beings obtain the oxygen that is required in the respiratory chain from the air.
But where does the hydrogen come from, with which the oxygen reacts to provide energy? The hydrogen is supplied to the respiratory chain by a process that scientists call the citric acid cycle or citric acid cycle. Find out more about the process of the citric acid cycle in the literature and name the products that are ultimately formed by him!

16 Click on the correct statement!
The citric acid cycle gives off hydrogen and carbon dioxide. In addition, energy is chemically bound in the form of ATP. The citric acid cycle releases water and carbon dioxide. In addition, energy is chemically bound in the form of GTP. The citric acid cycle gives off hydrogen and carbon. In addition, energy is chemically bound in the form of GTP. The citric acid cycle gives off hydrogen and carbon dioxide. In addition, energy is chemically bound in the form of GTP.

17 Unfortunately you were wrong
Unfortunately you were wrong! Think about why your answer couldn't be correct!

18 Correct! Now we can expand our graphical representation. You will find a corresponding suggestion on the next page

19 The graphic shows the relationships correctly.
GTPSoxygencitric acid cycleATP respiratory chainHydrogenWaterCarbon dioxideThe graphic shows the relationships correctly. The graphic does not show the relationships correctly

20 Unfortunately you were wrong
Unfortunately you were wrong! Think about why your answer couldn't be correct!

21 Correct! A cycle is a circular process that has to be driven like a wheel if it is to run. What drives the citric acid cycle? This happens because acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA for short) is constantly being smuggled into it. Most (60-80%) of this acetyl-CoA comes from the breakdown of fatty acids. This breakdown of fatty acids to acetyl-CoA is called ß-oxidation

22 C18H36O2 What are fatty acids?
Fatty acids are substances that consist of carbon (C), hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O). A well-known fatty acid from which candles are made, for example, is stearic acid. Use the following empirical formula: Compare stearic acid with glucose (grape sugar)! One molecule of stearic acid contains more hydrogen and more oxygen than glucose. One molecule of stearic acid contains more hydrogen and less oxygen than glucose. One molecule of stearic acid contains less hydrogen and less oxygen than glucose Molecule of stearic acid contains less hydrogen and more oxygen than glucose. C18H36O2

23 Unfortunately you were wrong
Unfortunately you were wrong! Think about why your answer couldn't be correct!

24 Correct, but what conclusion can one draw from this comparison? A molecule of fatty acid is less productive for energy production than a molecule of glucose, since it can deliver much less oxygen to the respiratory chain; a molecule of fatty acid is more productive for energy production than a molecule of glucose because it can deliver much more carbon to the respiratory chain. A molecule of fatty acid is just as productive for energy production as a molecule of glucose, since the composition of a molecule is of no importance for energy production. A molecule of fatty acid is more productive for energy production than a molecule of glucose as it can deliver a lot more hydrogen to the respiratory chain.

25 Fatty acids are substances that consist of carbon (C), hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O).
A well-known fatty acid from which candles are made, for example, is stearic acid. The following molecular formula: C18H36O2

26 Unfortunately you were wrong
Unfortunately you were wrong! Think about why your answer couldn't be correct!

27 Correct! Before we continue to get to know the cell respiration process, one last question to understand: .Where do the cells get the fatty acids required for cell respiration? Fatty acids are part of fats. They are mainly supplied to the body through food. Fatty acids are part of proteins. They are mainly supplied to the body through food. Fatty acids are part of fats. They are mainly produced in the body from glucose. Fatty acids are part of proteins. They are mainly made in the body from fats.

28 Unfortunately you were wrong
Unfortunately you were wrong! Think about why your answer couldn't be correct!

29 Correct, the cellular respiration scheme can now be expanded a second time. Move on to the next page and check out the suggestion!

30 The present scheme shows the relationships correctly.
The present scheme does not correctly reproduce the relationships.GTPSoxygencitric acid cycleATPAreaction chainAcetyl-CoAHydrogenCarbon dioxideWaterß-OxidationFatty acids

31 Unfortunately you were wrong
Unfortunately you were wrong! Think about why your answer couldn't be correct!

32 Correct, and with that you have almost completely worked out the interrelationships. There is really only one problem left to be resolved. Click on the statement in which the problem still to be solved is formulated: Where do the fatty acids that go into ß-oxidation come from? Where do the remaining 20-40% acetyl-CoA, which are introduced into the citric acid cycle, come from? Where is the carbon dioxide given off by the citric acid cycle?

33 Unfortunately you were wrong
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34 Correct! And these come from a process that scientists call glycolysis. In turn, refer to the literature to find out what else is produced in the course of glycolysis!

35 Click on the correct statement!
Glycolysis is a process in which one molecule of glucose is broken down into two molecules of pyruvic acid. In the overall balance, hydrogen and water are emitted. ADP is also created. The pyruvic acid then becomes acetyl-CoA. Glycolysis is a process in which one molecule of glucose is broken down into two molecules of pyruvic acid. Oxygen and water are released in the overall balance. In addition, ATP is created. The pyruvic acid then becomes acetyl-CoA. Glycolysis is a process in which one molecule of glucose is broken down into two molecules of pyruvic acid. Hydrogen and oxygen are emitted in the overall balance. In addition, ATP is created. The pyruvic acid then becomes acetyl-CoA. Glycolysis is a process in which one molecule of glucose is broken down into two molecules of pyruvic acid. In the overall balance, hydrogen and water are emitted. In addition, ATP is created. The pyruvic acid then becomes acetyl-CoA.

36 Unfortunately you were wrong
Unfortunately you were wrong! Think about why your answer couldn't be correct!

37 Correct! On the following page you will find the final proposal for a scheme that fully illustrates the cellular respiration processes in a simplified form

38 Cell respiration continues glucose ATP glycolysis hydrogen GTP oxygen
Pyruvic AcidCitric Acid CycleATP Respiratory ChainAcetyl-CoAHydrogenCarbon DioxideWaterß-OxidationFatty AcidsFurther

39 The diagram shows relationships correctly.
The diagram does not correctly reflect relationships.

40 Unfortunately you were wrong
Unfortunately you were wrong! Go back one more time and find out about the glycolysis process!

41 Cellular respiration continues glucose ATP glycolysis hydrogen GTP oxygen
Pyruvic AcidCitric Acid CycleATP Respiratory ChainAcetyl-CoAHydrogenCarbon DioxideWaterß-OxidationFatty AcidsFurther

42 Click on the correct statement!
Glycolysis is a process in which one molecule of glucose is broken down into two molecules of pyruvic acid. In the overall balance, hydrogen and water are emitted. ADP is also created. The pyruvic acid then becomes acetyl-CoA. Glycolysis is a process in which one molecule of glucose is broken down into two molecules of pyruvic acid. Oxygen and water are released in the overall balance. In addition, ATP is created. The pyruvic acid then becomes acetyl-CoA. Glycolysis is a process in which one molecule of glucose is broken down into two molecules of pyruvic acid. In the process, hydrogen and oxygen are emitted in the overall balance. In addition, ATP is created. The pyruvic acid then becomes acetyl-CoA. Glycolysis is a process in which one molecule of glucose is broken down into two molecules of pyruvic acid. In the overall balance, hydrogen and water are emitted. In addition, ATP is created. The pyruvic acid then becomes acetyl-CoA.

43 Correct! It is not shown that energy is produced in the course of glycolysis. It is not shown that water is produced in the course of glycolysis. It is not shown that pyruvic acid is produced during glycolysis. It is not shown that in the course of Glycolysis creates hydrogen.

44 Unfortunately you were wrong.
Go back to the diagram and check which substances are formed during glycolysis! Back to the diagram

45 Cell respiration continues glucose ATP glycolysis hydrogen GTP oxygen
Pyruvic AcidCitric Acid CycleATP Respiratory ChainAcetyl-CoAHydrogenCarbon DioxideWaterß-OxidationFatty AcidsFurther

46 Correct, but we can neglect this fact for our consideration. If you feel like it, you can think about where the water goes. Otherwise just keep going!

47 In the course of cell respiration, energy is generated in three places.
Click on the correct statement! Energy comes from glycolysis, from ß-oxidation and in the respiratory chain. Energy comes from ß-oxidation, in the citric acid cycle and in the respiratory chain. Energy comes from glycolysis, with ß- Oxidation and in the citric acid cycle. Energy is generated during glycolysis, in the citric acid cycle and in the respiratory chain.

48 Cellular respiration continues glucose ATP glycolysis hydrogen GTP oxygen
Pyruvic AcidCitric Acid CycleATP Respiratory ChainAcetyl-CoAHydrogenCarbon DioxideWaterß-OxidationFatty AcidsFurther

49 Unfortunately you were wrong.
Go back to the diagram and check where energy is generated! Back to the diagram

50 Cell respiration continues glucose ATP glycolysis hydrogen GTP oxygen
Pyruvic AcidCitric Acid CycleATP Respiratory ChainAcetyl-CoAHydrogenCarbon DioxideWaterß-OxidationFatty AcidsFurther

51 Correct, but the generation of energy is based on different requirements. Click on the correct statement! Oxygen is required for energy generation in the respiratory chain and in glycolysis, but not for the citric acid cycle. Oxygen is required for energy generation in the respiratory chain, while not in the glycolysis and citric acid cycle. For energy generation Oxygen is required in the respiratory chain and in the citric acid cycle, but not in glycolysis.

52 Unfortunately you were wrong.
Go back to the diagram and check where oxygen is needed for energy! Back to the diagram

53 Cellular respiration continues glucose ATP glycolysis hydrogen GTP oxygen
Pyruvic AcidCitric Acid CycleATP Respiratory ChainAcetyl-CoAHydrogenCarbon DioxideWater ß-OxidationFatty AcidsOther

54 Correct! Correspondingly, the respiratory chain also speaks of aerobic energy generation, in the glycolysis and citric acid cycle of anaerobic energy generation

55 Click on the correct statement!
The term aerobic in this context means “flying”, the term anaerobic “not flying”. The term aerobic in this context means “not requiring oxygen”, the term anaerobic means “requiring oxygen”. The term aerobic in this context means “requiring oxygen ", The term anaerobic" does not require oxygen ".

56 Unfortunately you were wrong! Go back one more time!

57 Correct, we can now add to the diagram again and thus get an expanded version. You can study them on the next page.